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St William of York Catholic Primary School

Curriculum

Learning Challenge

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Living things and their habitats-

Why would a dragon not make a good pet?

Science

What is your school made of?

Geog including geography fieldwork skills.

Materials

Why did the houses in London burn so quickly?

Geog/hist plus science – changing state of materials

What materials were used to rebuild London?

Geog.

London as a location/tourist destination/use and role of the Thames.

Science:

Plants

What do plants and seeds need to grow? (Seeds and bulbs).

Link to requirements for growth through texts.

SATs

Why do we love to be beside the seaside?

Development of Southport

History and geog.

How could you be the next Steven Gerrard?

Exercise and healthy living.

 

What do animals and humans need to survive?

 

English

The Last Wolf by Mini Grey

(revisiting Y1 text)

 

Narrative: A Hunting Story

Purpose: To narrate

 

Instruction: Recipes

Purpose: To instruct

 

Grammar: word, sentence, text & punctuation.

A River by Marc Martin

 

Narrative: Circular Narrative

Purpose: To narrate

 

Recount: Letter

Purpose: To inform

 

Grammar: word, sentence, text & punctuation.

The Night Gardener by The Fan Brothers

 

Narrative: Setting Narrative

Purpose: To narrate

 

Recount: Diary

Purpose: To irecount

The Bog Baby by Jeanne Willis

 

Narrative: Finding Narrative

Purpose: To narrate

 

Instructions: How to build a habitat

Purpose: To instruct

Grandad’s Island by Benji Davies

 

Narrative: Return Narrative

Purpose: To narrate

 

Information: Jungle animals

Purpose: Tp inform

The King Who Banned the Dark by Emily Haworth- Booth

 

Narrative: Banning Narrative

Purpose: To narrate

 

Persuasion: Persuasive letters

Purpose: To persuade

Rosie Revere Engineer by Andrea Beaty

 

Narrative: Invention Narrative

Purpose: To narrate

 

Explanation: How a machine works

Purpose: To explain

Class Novel and author study

 

Immerse the pupils in a range of texts about dragons.

Zog – Julia Donaldson.

The dragon who couldn’t help breathing fire – Denis Bond.

The Egg – M P Robertson.

The great dragon rescue – M.P.Robertson

Link to guided read (mixed ability)/ reciprocal reads

 

 

Read a range of texts and picture books which have links to other cultures.

Link to guided read (mixed ability)/ reciprocal reads

 

 

 

Author- Ronda Armitage The Light house Keeper series

Link to guided read (mixed ability)/ reciprocal reads

 

SPAG focus

 

Initially taught and then on-going throughout the year:

Revisit key year one skills.

 

 Write simple sentences that can be read by

themselves and others.

 Separate words with spaces.

Use punctuation to demarcate simple

sentences (capital letters and full stops).

 Use capital letter for the personal pronoun I.

 Use capital letters for names of people,

places and days of the week.

Identify and use question marks and

exclamation marks.

Use the joining word and to link words and

clauses.

 Extend range of joining words to link words

and clauses using but and or.

 

Refer to Klips document for revisiting key spelling objectives.

 

Year 2 objectives:

 

 Say, write and punctuate simple and

compound sentences using the joining words

and, but, so and or (co-ordination).

 Use sentences with different forms:

statement, question, command,

exclamation.

 Secure the use of full stops, capital letters,

exclamation marks and question marks.

Use commas to separate items in a list.

Use subordination for reason using because

and if e.g. I put my coat on because it was

raining. Because it was raining, I put on my

coat.

Use past tense for narrative, recount (e.g.

diary, newspaper report, biography) historical

reports.

Use present tense for non-chronological reports.

Select, generate and effectively use adjectives.

Identify, generate and effectively use noun phrases.

 

Please refer to KLIPs writing document and Babcock resources for guidance to support composition, spelling and handwriting.

 

 

Initially taught and then on-going throughout the year:

Revisit skills from term one.

 

Taught skills - spring term. (Cross reference with Babcock materials.)

Use apostrophes for contracted forms - e.g., don’t, can’t

, wouldn’t and I’ll.

Use apostrophes for singular possession in nouns, e.g., the girl’s name.

Use subordination for time using when, before and after - e.g., We went out to play when we had finished our writing.

When we had finished our writing, we went out to play.

Use the subordinating conjunction that in a sentence, e.g. - I hope that it doesn’t rain on sports day.

Select and generate and effectively use verbs.

Explore the progressive form of verbs in the present tense (e.g. - she is drumming) and past tense (e.g. - he was shouting) to mark actions in progress.

Select, generate and effectively use nouns.

Add suffixes ness and er to create nouns, e.g. - happiness, sadness, teacher and baker.

Create compound words using nouns - e.g., football and whiteboard.

Add suffixes ful or less to create adjectives, e.g. - playful, careful, careless and hopeless.

Add suffixes er and est to create adjectives e.g. - faster, fastest, smaller and smallest.

Select, generate and effectively use adverbs.

Use suffix ‘ly’ to turn adjectives into adverbs e.g., - slowly, gently and carefully.

 

Please refer to KLIPs writing document and Babcock resources for guidance to support composition, spelling and handwriting.

 

 

Initially taught and then on-going throughout the year:

Strategies for learning words. Using word banks for common exception words.

Dictation of sentences using hfwords. Spelling patterns continued

Learning strategies for common exception words. suffixes  and prefixes

 Handwriting-forming letters correctly. Using present and past tense consistently.

Mnemonics to remember tricky words

 

Spelling_

􀂃Add –ed, –ing, –er and –est to a root word ending in –

y with a consonant before it, e.g. copied, copier.

􀂃 Add the endings –ing, –ed, –er, –est and –y to words

ending in –e with a consonant before it, e.g. hiking,

hiked, hiker.

􀂃 Add –ing, –ed, –er, –est and –y to words of one

syllable ending in a single consonant letter after a

single vowel letter, e.g. patting, patted.

􀂃 Spell words ending in -tion, e.g. station, fiction

Write from memory simple sentences dictated by the

teacher that include words using the GPCs, common

exception words and punctuation taught so far.

 

Please refer to KLIPs writing document and Babcock resources for guidance to support composition, spelling and handwriting.

 

 

Maths

Number – Place Value

  • Read and write numbers to at least 100 in numerals and in words.
  • Recognise the place value of each digit in a two digit number (tens, ones)
  • Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations including the number line.
  • Compare and order numbers from 0 up to 100; use and = signs.
  • Use place value and number facts to solve problems.
  • Count in steps of 2, 3 and 5 from 0, and in tens from any number, forward and backward.

Number – Addition and Subtraction

  • Recall and use addition and subtraction facts to 20 fluently, and derive and use related facts up to 100.
  • Add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including: a two-digit number and ones; a two-digit number and tens; two two-digit numbers; adding three one-digit numbers.
  • Show that the addition of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and subtraction of one number from another cannot.
  • Solve problems with addition and subtraction: using concrete objects and pictorial representations, including those involving numbers, quantities and measures; applying their increasing knowledge of mental and written methods.
  • Recognise and use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction and use this to check calculations and solve missing number problems.

 Measurement: Money

  • Recognise and use symbols for pounds (£) and pence (p); combine amounts to make a particular value.
  • Find different combinations of coins that equal the same amounts of money.
  • Solve simple problems in a practical context involving addition and subtraction of money of the same unit, including giving change.
  • Multiplication and Division Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 times tables, including recognising odd and even numbers.
  • Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (x), division (÷) and equals (=) sign.
  • Solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts.
  • Show that the multiplication of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of one number by another cannot.

Multiplication and Division

  • Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 times tables, including recognising odd and even numbers.
  • Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (×), division (÷) and equals (=) signs.
  • Solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts.
  • Show that the multiplication of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of one number by another cannot.

 Statistics

  • Interpret and construct simple pictograms, tally charts, block diagrams and simple tables.
  • Ask and answer simple questions by counting the number of objects in each category and sorting the categories by quantity.
  • Ask and answer questions about totalling and comparing categorical data.

 Geometry- properties of shape

  • Identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes, including the number of sides and line symmetry in a vertical line.
  • Identify and describe the properties of 3-D shapes, including the number of edges, vertices and faces.
  • Identify 2-D shapes on the surface of 3-D shapes, [for example, a circle on a cylinder and a triangle on a pyramid.]
  • Compare and sort common 2-D and 3-D shapes and everyday objects.

Number – fractions

  • Recognise, find, name and write fractions 1 3 , 1 4 , 2 4 and 3 4 of a length, shape, set of objects or quantity.
  • Write simple fractions for example, 1 2 of 6 = 3 and recognise the equivalence of 2 4 and 1 2 .

Measurement: length and height

  • Choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure length/height in any direction (m/cm); mass (kg/g); temperature (°C); capacity (litres/ml) to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers, scales, thermometers and measuring vessels
  • Compare and order lengths, mass, volume/capacity and record the results using >, < and =

Position and Direction

  • Use mathematical vocabulary to describe position, direction and movement including movement in a straight line and distinguishing between rotation as a turn and in terms of right angles for quarter, half and three -quarter turns (clockwise and anti -clockwise).
  • Order and arrange combinations of mathematical objects in patterns and sequences

Problem solving and Efficient methods.

 

Measurement: Time

  • Tell and write the time to five minutes, including quarter past/to the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times.
  • Know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in a day.
  • Compare and sequence intervals of time.

Measurement: Mass, Capacity and Temperature

  • Choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure length/height in any direction (m/cm); mass (kg/g); temperature (°C); capacity (litres/ml) to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers, scales, thermometers and measuring vessels
  • Compare and order lengths, mass, volume/capacity and record the results using >, < and =

Science

Y2 Living things and their habitat

1.    explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive

2.    identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited and describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals and plants, and how they depend on each other

3.    identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including micro-habitats

4.    describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food.

 

Key Learning

All objects are either living, dead or have never been alive. Living things are plants (including seeds) and animals. Dead things include dead animals and plants and parts of plants and animals that are no longer attached e.g. leaves and twigs, shells, fur, hair and feathers (this is a simplification but appropriate for year 2 children).  An object made of wood is classed as dead. Objects made of rock, metal and plastic have never been alive (again ignoring that plastics are made of fossil fuels).

Animals and plants live in a habitat to which they are suited which means that animals have suitable features that help them move and find food and plants have suitable features that help them to grow well. The habitat provides the basic needs of the animals and plants – shelter, food and water. Within a habitat there are different micro-habitats e.g. in a woodland – in the leaf litter, on the bark of trees, on the leaves. These micro-habitats have different conditions e.g. light or dark, damp or dry. These conditions affect what plants and animals live there. The plants and animals in a habitat depend on each other for food and shelter etc.  The way that animals obtain their food from plants and other animals can be shown in a food chain.

 

Key vocabulary:

Living, dead, never been alive, suited, suitable, basic needs, food, food chain, shelter, move, feed, names of local habitats e.g. pond, woodland etc., names of micro-habitats e.g. under logs, in bushes etc.

 

Y2 Uses of everyday materials

1.     identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses

2.     find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching

 

Key Learning

All objects are made of one or more materials that are chosen specifically because they have suitable properties for the task. For example, a water bottle is made of plastic because it is transparent allowing you to see the drink inside and waterproof so that it holds the water. When choosing what to make an object from, the properties needed are compared with the properties of the possible materials, identified through simple tests and classifying activities. A material can be suitable for different purposes and an object can be made of different materials.

Objects made of some materials can be changed in shape by bending, stretching, squashing and twisting. For example, clay can be shaped by squashing, stretching, rolling, pressing etc. This can be a property of the material or depend on how the material has been processed e.g. thickness.

 

Key vocabulary

Names of materials – increased range from year 1

Properties of materials - as for year 1 plus opaque, transparent and translucent, reflective, non-reflective, flexible, rigid

Shape, push/pushing, pull/puling, twist/twisting, squash/squashing. Bend/bending, stretch/stretching

 

Y2 Plants

1.    observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants

2.    find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy.

 

Key Learning

Plants may grow from either seeds or bulbs. These then germinate and grow into seedlings which then continue to grow into mature plants. These mature plants may have flowers which then develop into seeds, berries, fruits etc. Seeds and bulbs need to be planted outside at particular times of the year and they will germinate and grow at different rates. Some plants are better suited to growing in full sun and some grow better in partial or full shade. Plants also need different amounts of water and space to grow well and stay healthy.

Key vocabulary

As for year 1 plus - light, shade, sun, warm, cool, water, grow, healthy

 

Y2 Animals including humans

1.    notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults

2.    find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air)

3.    describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene

 

Key Learning

 Animals including humans have offspring which grow into adults. In humans and some animals these offspring will be young, such as babies or kittens, that grow into adults. In other animals, such as chickens or insects, there may be eggs laid that hatch to young or other stages which then grow to adults. The young of some animals do not look like their parents e.g. tadpoles.

All animals including humans have basic needs of feeding, drinking and breathing that must be satisfied in order to survive, and to grow into healthy adults they also need the right amounts and types of food and exercise. Good hygiene is also important in preventing infections and illnesses.

Key vocabulary:

Offspring, reproduction, growth, child, young/old stages (examples - chick/hen, baby/child/adult, caterpillar/butterfly), exercise, heartbeat, breathing, hygiene, germs, disease, food types (examples – meat, fish, vegetables, bread, rice, pasta)

 

Art and Design

3D/ Sculpture

 

1. Show children pictures of Massai warriors and ask them if they know who they are. Have you seen

anyone like this before?

2. Explain they are Massai warriors who are part of the Maasai tribes in Africa. Explain who

the Maasai warriors are and what they do.

3. Look at images of how Maasai people live and discuss their culture with the children.

4. Show children images of Maasai people performing and ask them to guess what they are doing.

ssai necklace out of ‘Herculite No2 plaster’ threaded with a shoelace into a pre- drilled hole. Paint the necklace using their own African print designs.

10. Create a whole class patchwork of African art samples which they design themselves.

5. Explain to your class music and dance are an important feature of the Maasai culture and show them a

clip of the Maasai people dancing such as: http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/clips/zjndtfr or https://

www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYoTf0OyMzI.

6. Maasai people make their own clothes and jewellery that are bright and colourful.

7. Go through the slides showing the different jewellery made by the Maasai people and discuss how they

were made and the colours used with the children.

8. Children to make a Maasai headband. They need to add dangly bits and pointy features to the

headband, in addition to collaged offcuts of African print fabric. Introduce sewing skills to add dangly items.

 

 

3D/ Sculpture objectives

  • Gather and sort the materials they will need
  • Sort threads and fabric
  • Group fabrics and threads by colour and texture
  • Use more than one type of stitch
  • Join fabric using glue
  • Sew fabrics together
  • Begin to sculpt clay and other moldable materials

 

Sketchbook objectives

  • Identify what they might change in their current work or develop in their future work
  • Record and explore ideas from first hand observation, experience and imagination
  • Annotate work in sketchbook
  • Keep notes in their sketchbook as to how they have changed their work

 

Knowledge

  • Say how other artists have used colour, pattern and shape
  • Create a piece of work in response to another artist’s piece of work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Painting

 

1.        Children to be taught how to create a full palette of colours using powder paints, including tints and tones.

2.        Teach the grid method of enlarging with the aim of retaining size, perspective and proportion.

3.        Teacher to print off several A4 images of the ‘Great Fire of London’.

4.        Children will choose their favourite which they’d like to replicate and teacher will ‘grid up’ as appropriate- 16 grids are required for correct and accurate enlargement.

Children will draw and paint, using powder paints, their chosen image of the ‘Great Fire of London’.

 

Painting objectives

·         Mix paint to create all the secondary colours.

·         Mix and match colours, predict outcomes.

·         Mix their own brown.

·         Make tints by adding white.

·         Make tones by adding black.

·         Create a print using pressing, rolling, rubbing and stamping.

·         Create a print like a designer.

 

Sketchbook objectives

 

·         Identify what they might change in their current work or develop in their future work.

·         Record and explore ideas from first hand observation, experience and imagination.

·         Annotate work in sketchbook.

Keep notes in their sketchbooks as to how they have changed their work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drawing

 

Children to study the illustrations in ‘The Tin Forest’ by Helen Ward and Wayne Anderson.
Compare and contrast the varying settings, techniques of colour, pattern, line, shape, form, space and composition.

Children will be introduced to two new mediums, charcoals of varying shades of grey and black, in addition to oil pastels for the vibrant colour.

 

Children will reproduce their own contrasting images of the two sides of the forest. A3 cartridge paper to be split down the middle. On the left, children select their favourite ‘grey’ image to reproduce and, on the right, children choose their favourite colourful image to reproduce.

 

Teaching points to include drawing the images which are most prominent first and finer details to be drawn towards the end, how to accurately transfer shapes and pictures onto their own work whilst retaining proportion and how to use the images in the composition to help the children to gauge the correct size and position of what they are drawing.

 

Drawing objectives

  • Draw for a sustained period of time from the figure and real objects, including single and grouped objects
  • Experiment with the visual elements; line, shape, pattern and colour.
  • Look at the drawings and comment thoughtfully, begin to discuss the use of shadows and use of light/ dark
  • Sketch to make quick records of something
  • Work out ideas through drawing

 

Sketchbook objectives

  • Identify what they might change in their current work or develop in their future work
  • record and explore ideas from first hand observation, experience and imagination
  • Annotate work in sketchbook
  • Keep notes in their sketchbooks as to how they have changed their work

 

Knowledge

  • Say how other artists have used colour, pattern and shape
  • Create a piece of work min response to another artist’s piece of work

DT

Textiles

 

Making a felt Christmas Stocking

 

 

Design 

  • design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology (children to video each other talking through why they have chosen their particular design)

Make

  • select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing]
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics

Evaluate  

  • explore and evaluate a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria

 

Mechanisms - Sliders and Levers

 

Moving Card/pictures

 

 

Design 

  • design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology (use the internet to explore ideas and already made products).

Make

  • select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing]
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics

Evaluate  

  • explore and evaluate a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria

 

Technical knowledge 

  •  explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products.

 

Cooking and Nutrition

 

Making a fruit Salad

 

  • use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes 
  • understand where food comes from.

 

Design 

  • design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology

 

Make

  • select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing]

Evaluate   

  • evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria

 

 

 

Geography

Geography basic skills

To revise the four countries of the UK

To revise that the UK is made up of islands

To recognise outline of UK on an atlas and a globe - to know where the U.K. is.

To know where Liverpool and the river Mersey is on the map of the UK

To know where all the capital cities are on a map of the UK

To create a list of physical and human features of the local area

To recognise a map of the local area.

To use a key

Looking at the Map of the UK. Looking at maps and globes.

Refer to key physical features such as land, hills coast, rivers and sea.

To have an understanding of daily weather maps

 

Key concepts and words

Uk, capital city, islands, seas, settlements, homes roads

border, map, Digi-maps, key, zoom in,

 

Would you rather live in the UK or Kenya?

 

Africa culture, climate food-linked to literacy text

 

Lila and the secret rain

 

  1. To know that Africa is a continent - fact file on Kenya
  2. To identify some countries in Africa - Kenya and South Africa
  3. Where Kenya is in the world
  4. Identify key landscape features of Kenya and significant settlements
  5. Exploration of game reserves and national parks - purpose and function
  6. To know that the climate is hot and different from the UK
  7. To identify similarities and differences between the UK and Africa - comparing climate, landscape, culture
  8. Exploration of the Maasai people

 

Key concepts and words

Africa,continent, hot, humid,dry, vegetation, game reserve, national park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No geography to be taught this term

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Lighthouse Keeper’s lunch

Locate the seven continents and five oceans.

  1. To find and name the seven continents on a globe and on a map
  2. To know something about each continent
  3. To locate the five oceans on a globe and on a map.

          

Key concepts and words - continent, desert,Europe, Asia, Oceania, Africa, Antarctica,North America and South America, mountain ranges, ocean,Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Arctic,and Southern.

 

Fieldwork and mapping

  1. Formulate questionnaires to address line of enquiry
  2. Map area around beach and surrounding streets

 

Why do people visit Crosby beach?

 

  1. Map route to the beach - devise own maps - create a title for the map and begin to interpret OS symbols on a map.
  2. Create a key for the map and discuss the importance of keys.
  3. Identify key physical features of the beach and surrounding area - aerial photographs, Google Earth
  4. Google Earth - by zooming in you see a smaller area in more detail
  5. Create sketch map of the beach and surrounding area
  6. Use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language to describe the location of features and routes on a map  
  7. Revisit tides - explore tide times and their effects on landscape - safety issues
  8. Visit Coastguard Station - interview staff on purpose and function in order to answer the key question

 

Visit the Coastguard station at Crosby

 

  1. What activities are people engaged in,are people local or tourists?
  2. Have people come to see the artwork?
  3. How many ships/ vessels within a time frame
  4. What facilities are there?
  5. Visit Leisure centre and use questionnaires to visitors and staff

Draw conclusions and present findings in a variety of forms - graphs, statistics, maps and narrative.

 

Key concepts and words

North, south,east west,near, far, left, right, key,compass,globe,title of map,  sketch maps, coast guard, zoom in,lifeguard,Anthony Gormley,leisure,tides,beach, sand, questionnaire,interview

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

History

No history will be taught in the autumn term.

Events beyond living memory.

Why did the houses burn so quickly during The Great Fire of London?

Chronological Understanding:

Put three or more people, events or objects in order using a given scale – beyond 100 years.

Use words and phrases such as recently, before, after, now and later.

Uses past and present when telling others about an event.

Knowledge and understanding of past events, people and changes in the past:

Uses information to describe the past.

Uses information to describe differences between then and now.

Recounts the main events from a significant period in history.

Uses evidence to explain reasons why people in the past acted as they did.

Historical Interpretation:

Looks at books and pictures (and eye-witness accounts, photos, artefacts, buildings, visits and the internet).

Understands why some people in the past did things.

Historical Enquiry:

Looks carefully at pictures or objects to find information about the past.

Asks questions such as:

‘What was it like for a …?’

‘What happened in the past?’

‘How long ago did … happen?’

Estimates the ages of people by studying and describing their features.

Organisation and Communication:

Describes objects, people and events.

Writes own date of birth.

Writes simple recounts about the past.

Draws labelled diagrams and writes about them to tell others about people, events and objects from the past.

 

Local History.

Why did people in the past visit Southport for their seaside holiday?

Chronological Knowledge:

Know where events fit in a simple chronological framework.

Correctly names the period studied.

Uses simple vocabulary and phrases to describe the passage of time.

Historical Enquiry and Interpretation:

Asks and answers questions about events/people studied.

Shows an awareness of a range of sources when giving examples about ways they can find out about historical events.

Records observations to show their own account of what happened historically.

Continuity and Change:

Recognises simple elements which may have changed in history.

Recognises simple reasons behind the changes in elements of life during a period of history.

Causes and Consequences:

Compares what life was like in relation to their own/another time in history.

Computing

You’ve got mail

The aim of this apptivity is to help children explore how they can use email to communicate with real people within their schools, families, and community.

  • Recognise common uses of information technology beyond the school
  • Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content

 

Super Sci-Fi

This space inspired project starts by children creating a simple space invader game. The children will then create their own digital graphics that they will export to use in a second game that they will create using advanced settings. The children will also learn about mnemonics and create their own interactive quiz as well as bring Neil Armstrong to life retelling his story!

  • Use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies
  • Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content

 Whatever the Weather

This apptivity will get children looking at data and how it can be presented to allow it to be interpreted. Children will have to gather the data and then select the most appropriate method to display the data they have captured – in graphical format. This will teach them some of the fundamental skills of desktop publishing packages.

  • Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content

Code-tastic

The best way for children to learn about computer programs and algorithms is to have a go themselves. This apptivity lets them use a variety of programming apps/software to give children a practical understanding of how computer programs actually run, how a computer follows a sequence of instructions and what to do when a program goes wrong.

  • Understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions
  • Create and debug simple programs
  • Use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs

Young Authors

This apptivity will take the children on a technological journey that will show them how technology has advanced over the years. They will research particular pieces of technology that has shaped the current technological world we live in. Once they have captured this information they will produce a book to show what they have learned.

 

  • Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content
  • Use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies

Let’s Fix It

This apptivity has been designed to challenge children to analyse simple computer programs and for them to identify the errors within the code and then find a solution.

  • Create and debug simple programs
  • Use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs

 

Music

Unit: Hands, feet and heart/Ho Ho Ho

Style: African

 

Throughout  the unit, children will learn:

· How to listen to music.

·  To sing the song

·  To understand the  geographical origin of the music and in which era it was composed

· To experience and learn how to apply key musical concepts/elements e.g. finding a pulse, clapping a rhythm, use of pitch.

· To play the accompanying instrumental parts (optional).

· To work together in a band/ensemble.

· To develop creativity through improvising and composing within the song

· To understand and use the first 5 notes of C major scale while improvising and composing.

· To experience links to other areas of the curriculum

· To recognise the style of the music and to understand its main style indicators.

· To understand and use general musical vocabulary and specific vocabulary linked to the song

· To undertake all these independently.

Christmas Nativity

Unit: I Wanna Play In A Band/Zootime

Style: Rock

Throughout  the unit, children will learn:

· How to listen to music.

·  To sing the song

·  To understand the  geographical origin of the music and in which era it was composed

· To experience and learn how to apply key musical concepts/elements e.g. finding a pulse, clapping a rhythm, use of pitch.

· To play the accompanying instrumental parts (optional).

· To work together in a band/ensemble.

· To develop creativity through improvising and composing within the song

· To understand and use the first 5 notes of C major scale while improvising and composing.

· To experience links to other areas of the curriculum

· To recognise the style of the music and to understand its main style indicators.

· To understand and use general musical vocabulary and specific vocabulary linked to the song

· To undertake all these independently.

Unit: Reflect, rewind and replay

Style: western classical

Performance focus unit: Friendship Song

 

This unit will consolidate learning across previous unit. Children will prepare for a performance from the Friendship Song unit.

PE

Top Play- Kicking

 

  • To improve control and coordination
  • To choose and use simple tactics

 

Top Play- Throwing

 

  • To improve the coordination of their bodies and equipment
  • To choose and use simple tactics
  • To recognise good quality in performance
  • To remember, repeat and link combination skills
  • Use information to improve their work

Top Play- Sending and receiving

  • Explore and use skills that suit the game
  • Describe what they are doing
  • To remember, repeat and link combination skills
  • To choose and use simple tactics

Dance

Great Fire Of London.

  • explore ideas by improvising and experimenting with actions, dynamics, directions and levels
  • choose and link actions to make short dance phrases that express on idea, mood or feeling phrase
  • perform dance phrases using dynamic qualities to express moods and feelings
  • describe dance phrases and expressive qualities

Top Play- Gymnastics

 

  • To remember, repeat and link combinations of gymnastic actions, body shapes and balance with control and precision
  • To lift, move and place equipment safely
  • To improve their work using information they have gained by watching, listening and investigating

 

Top Play Athletics

 

  • To improve technique of running. 
  • To use a range of basic jumps
  • To jump in different ways and combine jumps together. 
  • To choose a specific running style that suits the task
  • To improve technique of throwing
  • To throw objects accurately
  • To develop jumping technique to gain height
  • Our Mission Statement
  • Together Everyone Achieves More.
  • To go forward in Christ, to respect our neighbour and to always give our best.
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